Christmas Craft Fair Friday 14th December 5.00pm

Science Curriculum        

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Seasonal changes

·          observe changes across the four seasons

·          observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.

Plants

·     Identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees

·     Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.

 

Animals including humans

·          identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals

·          identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores

·          describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and invertebrates, and including pets).

·          Identif, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.

 

Materials

·          distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made

·     identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock

·     describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials

·         compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

 

Humans

·          notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

·          find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)

·         describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

 

 

All living things and their habitats

 

§ explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive

§ identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other

§ identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including micro-habitats

§ describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food

 

Plants

observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.

Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.

 

 

Materials

·          identify and compare the uses of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard

·          find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.

 

Plants

·          identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem, leaves and flowers

·          explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant

·          investigate the way in which water is transported within plants

·          explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

 

Animals, including humans

·          identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat

·          identify that humans and some animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

 

Rocks

·          compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties

·          describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock

·          recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter

 

Light

·          recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light

·          notice that light is reflected from surfaces

·          recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect the eyes

·          recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object

·          find patterns in the way that the size of the shadows change

 

Forces and Magnets

·          compare how things move on different surfaces

·          notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance

·          observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others

·          compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials

·          describe magnets as having two poles

·         predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

Living things and their habitats

·          Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways

·          Explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment

·          recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things

 

Animals including humans

·          describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans

·          identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions

·          construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey

 

States of Matter

·          compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases

·          observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius C)

·          identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature

Sound

·          identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating

·          recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear

·          find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it

·          find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it.

·          Recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

 

Electricity

·          identify common appliances that run on electricity

·          construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers

·          identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery

·          recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit

·          recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors

 

Living things and their habitats

·          describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird

·          describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

 

Animals, including humans:

·          describe the changes as humans develop to old age.

 

Properties and Changes of Materials

·          compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal) and response to magnets

·          know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution

·          use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating

·          give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic

·          demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes

·          explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.

 

Forces

·          explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object

·          identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces

·          recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

 

·          Earth and Space

·          describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system

·          describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth

·          describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies

·          use the idea of the Earths rotation to explain day and night.

 

Living things and their habitats

·          describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals

·          give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics

 

Animals including Humans

·          identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and explain the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood

·          recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on

·          the way their bodies function

·          describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.

 

Evolution and Inheritance

·          recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago

·          recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents

·          identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

 

Light

·          recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines

·          Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye

·          explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes

·          use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

 

Electricity

·          associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit

·          compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches

·          use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.

 

 History Curriculum                                      

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

·         Changes within living memory.  Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life Toys)

·         Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality (Richard III)

·         Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally (Remembrance Day)

·         The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods (Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole)

 

·         Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

(The Stone Age)

·     The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of Ancient Egypt;

(The Egyptians)

·      

·   The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

(The Romans)

·   A significant turning point in British history, e.g. the first railways or the Battle of Britain

(The Tudors)

 

§ A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

§ (World war Two)

§ Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world (Ancient Greece)

 

 

 

§ The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

(Anglo Saxons)

§ A local history study (Victorians and mining)

 

 

 

 Geography Curriculum 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

 

 

Village Settlers

 

Countries of the World

 

Rainforests

 

Local woodlands (Contrasting environment)

Rivers

 

The United Kingdom (Linked to WW II)

 

Coasts

Extreme Earth : Mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes

 

Local Geography (Linked to local History)

 

The Mountain Environment

Human and Physical Geography

identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles

 

Locational Knowledge

name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans

 

Geographical Skills

use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage

 

Place Knowledge

understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

 

Locational Knowledge name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

 

Human and Physical Geography

use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather

key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

 

Geographical Skills

use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries

 

         use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map

           use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key

         use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

 

 

 

 

Describe and understand:

 

Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources.

 

Locational Knowledge

locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities

 

Place Knowledge

understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

 

Geographical Skills

use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

 

Describe and understand:

Physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

 

Locational Knowledge

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle.

 

Geographical Skills

use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locational Knowledge

name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features ( coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

 

Human and Physical Geography

describe and understand key aspects of:

·         physical geography, including: rivers and the water cycle

·         human geography, including: the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

Geographical Skills

use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

 

use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

 

 

Locational Knowledge

Name and locate geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features ( mountains), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

 

Human and Physical Geography

describe and understand key aspects of:

·         physical geography, including: mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes

·         human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links

 

 

Geographical Skills

use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

 

use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world

 

use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

 

French Curriculum 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

1. Moi (All about me)
2. Jeux et chansons (Games and songs)
3. On fait la fête (Celebrations)
4. Portraits (Portraits)
5. Les quatre amis (The four friends)
6. ça pousse (Growing things)

1. On y va (All aboard)
2. L’argent de poche (Pocket money)
3. Raconte-moi une histoire! (Tell me a story)
4. Vive le sport! (Our sporting lives)
5. Le Carnaval des Animaux (The Carnival of Animals)
6. Quel temps fait-il? (What's the weather like?)

1. Bon appétite, bonne santé (Healthy eating)
2. Je suis le musician (I am the music man)
3. En route pour l’école (On the way to school)
4. Scène de plage (Beach scene)
5. Le retour du printemps (The return of spring)
6. Les planètes (The planets)

1. Notre école (Our school)
2. Notre monde (The world about us)
3. Le passé et le present (Then and now)
4. Monter un café (Setting up a café)
5. Quoi de neuf? (What’s in the news?)










Art and Design            

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

·         Printing

Print with a range of hard and soft materials e.g. corks, pen barrels, sponge

Make simple marks on rollers and printing palettes

Take simple prints i.e. mono printing

Roll printing ink over found objects to create patterns e.g. plastic mesh, stencils

Build repeating patterns and recognise pattern in the environment

Create simple printing blocks with press print

Design more repetitive patterns

Colour

Experiment with overprinting motifs and colour

Texture

Make rubbings to collect textures and patterns

 

·         Collage

Create images from a variety of media e.g. photocopies material, fabric, crepe paper , magazines etc

Arrange and glue materials to different backgrounds

Sort and group materials for different purposes e.g. colour texture

Fold, crumple, tear and overlap papers

Work on different scales

Colour

Collect, sort, name match colours appropriate for an image

Shape

Create and arrange shapes appropriately

Texture

Create, select and use textured paper for an image

 

·         Painting

Use a variety of tools and techniques including different brush sizes and types

Mix and match colours to artefacts and objects

Work on different scales

Experiment with tools and techniques e.g. layering, mixing media, scrapping through

Name different types of paint and their properties

Colour

Identify primary colours by name

Mix primary shades and tones

Texture

Create textured paint by adding sand, plaster

·         3D

Manipulate malleable materials in a variety of ways including rolling and kneading

Explore sculpture with a range of malleable media

Manipulate malleable materials for a purpose, e.g. pot, tile

Understand the safety and basic care of materials and tools

Form

Experiment with constructing and joining recycled, natural and manmade materials

Use simple 2D shapes to create a 3D form

Texture

Change the surface of a malleable material e.g. build a textured tile

 

 

 

 

 

·         Textiles

Match and sort fabrics and threads for colour, texture, length, size and shape

Change and modify threads and fabrics, knotting, fraying, fringing, pulling threads, twisting, plaiting

Cut and shape fabric using scissors/snips

Apply shapes with glue or by stitching

Apply decoration using beads, buttons, feathers etc

Create cords and plaits for decoration

Colour

Apply colour with printing, dipping, fabric crayons

Create and use dyes i.e. onion skins, tea, coffee

Texture

Create fabrics by weaving materials i.e. grass through twigs, carrier bags

on a bike wheel

 

·         Painting

Use a variety of tools and techniques including different brush sizes and types

Mix and match colours to artefacts and objects

Work on different scales

Experiment with tools and techniques e.g. layering, mixing media, scrapping through

Name different types of paint and their properties

Colour

Identify primary colours by name

Mix primary shades and tones

Texture

Create textured paint by adding sand, plaster

 

·         3D

Plan, design and make models from observation or imagination

Join clay adequately and construct a simple base for extending and modelling other shapes

Create surface patterns and textures in a malleable material

Use papier mache to create a simple 3D object

 

·         Textiles

Use a variety of techniques, e.g. printing, dyeing, weaving and stitching to create different textural effects

Match the tool to the material

Develop skills in stitching, cutting and joining

Experiment with paste resist.

 

·         Painting

Experiment with different effects and textures inc. blocking in colour, washes, thickened paint creating textural effects

Work on a range of scales e.g. thin brush on small picture etc.

Create different effects and textures with paint according to what they need for the task.

Colour

Mix colours and know which primary colours make secondary colours

Use more specific colour language

Mix and use tints and shades

 

 

·         Printing

Create printing blocks using a relief or impressed method

Create repeating patterns

Print with two colour overlays

 

·         Collage

Experiment with a range of collage techniques such as tearing, overlapping and layering to create images and represent textures

Use collage as a means of collecting ideas and information and building a visual vocabulary

 

·         Painting

Experiment with different effects and textures inc. blocking in colour, washes, thickened paint creating textural effects

Work on a range of scales e.g. thin brush on small picture etc.

Create different effects and textures with paint according to what they need for the task.

Colour

Mix colours and know which primary colours make secondary colours

Use more specific colour language

Mix and use tints and shades

 

 

·         Collage.

Add collage to a painted, printed or drawn background

 

Use a range of media to create collages

 

Use different techniques, colours and textures etc when designing and making pieces of work

 

Use collage as a means of extending work from initial ideas.

 

 

·         3-D

Shape, form, model and construct from observation or imagination

 

Use recycled, natural and manmade materials to create sculptures

 

Plan a sculpture through drawing and other preparatory work

 

Develop skills in using clay inc. slabs, coils, slips, etc

 

Produce intricate patterns and textures in a malleable media

 

 

·         Painting

Develop a painting from a drawing

 

Carry out preliminary studies, trying out different media and materials and mixing appropriate colours

 

Create imaginative work from a variety of sources e.g. observational drawing, themes, poetry, music

 

Colour

Mix and match colours to create atmosphere and light effects

 

Be able to identify primary secondary, complementary and contrasting colours

 

Work with complementary colours

 

·         Textiles

Use fabrics to create 3D structures

Use different grades of threads and needles

 

Experiment with batik techniques

 

Experiment with a range of media to overlap and layer creating interesting colours and textures and effect

 

·         Printing

Create printing blocks by simplifying an initial sketch book idea

 

Use relief or impressed method

 

Create prints with three overlays

 

Work into prints with a range of

media e.g. pens, colour pens and paints

 

 

·         Painting

Develop a painting from a drawing

 

Carry out preliminary studies, trying out different media and materials and mixing appropriate colours

 

Create imaginative work from a variety of sources e.g. observational drawing, themes, poetry, music

 

Colour

Mix and match colours to create atmosphere and light effects

 

Be able to identify primary secondary, complementary and contrasting colours

 

Work with complementary colours

 

 

 


Published 12th November 2018